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Posts Tagged ‘League of Women Voters’

Looks like I’m going to have quite a bit of company in opposing the proposed half-cent sales tax for medical research.

The Star’s Yael Abouhalkah reported yesterday that The League of Women Voters in Kansas City/Jackson/Clay/Platte counties will oppose the tax.

Abouhalkah wrote:

In an interview, president Linda Vogel Smith said the league primarily opposed using a regressive sales tax to pay for the research. She said the league thought the medical groups could get money from other sources, and public revenue should be used for “local infrastructure needs.”

That’s a heck of a blow to the tax’s prospects for passage.

The Civic Council, with its rush-job tactics and speculative foray, has run afoul of the most important women’s group in the area.

Already, by my unofficial reckoning, we’ve got about 50 percent of  the electorate — women –against the measure.

I guess the Civic Council will be calling on all manly men to stand up for translational medical research to the tune of $40 million to $50 million a year for 20 years.

(Sorry, I don’t have time to explain what translational medical research is; I’ll leave that up to the proponents.)

Guys tend to like big numbers, and we’ll just have to see if they respond well to the prospect of spending $1 billion on a shaky proposition over the next 20 years.

Another bad omen, also laid out in Abhoulkah’s story, was that the chairman of the Kansas City Regional Transit Alliance questioned moving ahead with the medical research tax while Jackson County’s commuter rail idea is still pending.

Kite Singleton, a well-known, retired architect, said his group did not specifically oppose the sales-tax proposal, but he stated, “This is not a time to redirect our community’s focus to another interest,” the alliance release said.

Until earlier this year, Jackson county Executive Mike Sanders had been pushing for a sales-tax proposal to build a commuter rail system. For some reason, he dropped that and now has jumped on the Civic Council bandwagon.

He probably reckons that his prospects of attaining higher office are better if he plays ball with the Civic Council and the Chamber of Commerce of Greater Kansas city, which also has endorsed the medical-research tax.

As most of you know, I registered an opposing committee, Committee to Stop a Bad Cure, on Tuesday.

Another registered opposition group (the first to file, actually) is called Citizens for Responsible Research. It is led by a personal-injury lawyer named Brad Bradshaw, who has several offices around the state. The Star has said he is based in Springfield. Bradshaw, who is also a physician, has contributed $50,000 to his campaign committee, Dave Helling reported today on The Star’s web site.

Bradshaw favors some sort of statewide tax to support medical research, and the Civic Council Sales Tax could upset his apple cart.

As of today, the Civic Council’s bandwagon seems to be losing riders, while organized opposition is mushrooming.

Now, if we can just get the Marching Cobras on our side, we’ll have a loud and energetic run-up to the election.

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